Pivot Point-heavy Trading on Trade Rush

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    Top Binary Options Broker 2020!
    Best Choice For Beginners!
    Big Sign-Up Bonus!
    Free Trading Education!
    Free Demo Account!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only For Experienced Traders!

Contents

Pivot Point-heavy Trading on Trade Rush

I went back to some USD/CHF trading on TradeRush this Tuesday (August 27, 2020), as that asset gives me the best payout I can find on standard high/low options. As the title to this article suggests, I relied heavily on pivot points in my trading today and several of these levels were visited on the USD/CHF. They really do act as strong guiding features in my trading by helping to determine where price might go and potentially reverse, or show some type of sensitivity at the very least.

My first trade came down at the 0.92132 support 1 level. This price acted as support just after 1AM EST and I expected that it would likely hold again if price action should support another bounce. On the re-touch on the 1:50 candlestick, price bounced off and formed a long doji candle, which is commonly indicative of market indecision and hence potential reversal. Therefore, I took a call option on the touch of 0.92132 on the 1:55 candle. Being this was TradeRush, I was using 15-minute options here, so this trade closed on the 2:10 candle (i.e., starts at 2:10, ends at 2:15), and wound up as a six-pip winner.

The retracement from the bounce off support 1 went for about seven pips. That doesn’t seem like much, but in such a low-volatility time period, a seven-pip rebound was good enough to trade back into several recent areas of minor resistance.

As a result, given the retracement was sufficiently strong, I continued to keep support 1 as an area to consider call options going forward. Sure enough, on the 2:20 candle, price touched and rejected 0.92132 again and set up a call option on the touch of the level on the 2:25 candle. This trade went through a lot of drama and went both ways many times. It fell through right away, before wicking back up and closing at 0.92132. It fell hard again on the 2:30 candle, saw a strong bounce on the 2:35, before spending some time ITM on the closing candle before losing by about two pips.

For just over a half-hour period starting on the 3:45 candlestick, price experienced a large unexpected drop before reversing around 4AM EST and picking up forty pips in about twenty minutes. There wasn’t any news at this time outside of German IFO survey data at 4AM (economic sentiment index), but that’s a very minor event and not enough to effect the market in that way, and the move started before it regardless. I checked other pairs to see what currency seemed to be the one affected. The EUR/USD and EUR/JPY both dropped by about fifty pips. A very USD-heavy pair like the USD/CAD only rose about twelve pips. So clearly it was probably some European bank likely dumping Euros before European market hours and the effect of the transaction was being felt throughout the forex market given it’s all intertwined and correlated to varying extents. It’s rare that something like this happens, but fortunately I wasn’t in a binary trade at this time.

Once the market finally started leveling out, I began targeting put options at the daily pivot point of 0.92293 and call options back down at the 0.92132 support 1 level. A line of resistance did form around 0.92233 right around 4:30AM EST and it was tempting to take a put option there. But recognizing that the trend was up and had seen a lot of recent upward momentum, in addition to the fact that a test of the daily pivot seemed likely, I decided against a put option. It ultimately turned out to be a good decision.

The market came less than a pip shy of testing the daily pivot before coming back down to support 1 (0.92132). By the time price hit support 1, the market pattern seemed to suggest a breach of 0.92132. However, just by watching the chart it didn’t seem like the market had the energy to do much of anything. Once it did touch 0.92132 on the 6:10 candle, it bounced off the level by about four pips on the following candle before re-touching on the 6:20. Given I was only looking at about a five-minute trade at this point I decided to get in for a short bounce. So I took a call option at 0.92132 for the third time today and had a two-pip winner by expiration.

Price did open and close below support 1 on the 6:40 candle, and although I expected price to continue falling, it stayed surprisingly buoyant and spent the better part of the next two hours ranging back up between support 1 and the daily pivot. The USD/CHF did, however, end up below its support 3 line for the day after shedding over forty pips near the U.S. market open.

But overall, I was 2/3 ITM today and I can always be happy with a day like that. And, of course, no fancy strategy techniques were applied. This was one of those days where no real support or resistance cleanly set up just from the price action or price history alone. But I was able to use the pivot points to give me a better idea of where the market could go be going and what could happen when it gets there. For that reason, I’m a strong believer that pivot points are probably the most effective binary options indicator for short-term/intraday trading, at least for those who like to rely on support and resistance as the general basis of their trading.

2020 NBA free agents now eligible to be traded

The Trevor Ariza debacle is amazing on several levels. Obviously two teams not understanding which player is getting traded because of a name mix-up is rare, but what’s even more incredible is that this all happened before Ariza could legally be traded. As a general rule, NBA teams can’t trade free agents as soon as they sign. There are exceptions under specific circumstances for sign-and-trade agreements, but for the most part, the league expects teams to keep players they sign for a reasonable length of time. Think of the optics. Imagine if the Golden State Warriors had signed Kevin Durant and then immediately traded him for players that they wouldn’t have had access to otherwise.

That would have been a PR disaster, and it would have been highly unfair to him or any free agent under those circumstances. A player signs with a team with the expectation that they will play for that team. They may not for the life of their contract, but they deserve to at least start the season with the team of their choice. It’s just common sense. The NBA isn’t franchise mode in a video game. There are strict rules governing trades.

What exactly are those rules when it comes to free agent signings? Here are the basics:

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    Top Binary Options Broker 2020!
    Best Choice For Beginners!
    Big Sign-Up Bonus!
    Free Trading Education!
    Free Demo Account!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only For Experienced Traders!

  • Most free agents signed during the offseason can be traded on December 15th of that league year or three months after signing their deal, whichever comes second. In a given year, this will usually comprise around 80 percent of free agent additions.
  • The most common exception relates to players that can only be traded on January 15th or later. There are two reasons why a player might not be tradeable until this date. The first relates to a term from old collective bargaining agreements called “Base-Year Compensation” that attempted to make it harder for teams to sign players for the purpose of trading them. It has largely been done away with in the modern league, and usually only crops up in regards to players who reached restricted free agency. The second is when a team exercises either “Early-Bird Rights” or ” Larry Bird Rights” to re-sign one of its own players. This exception, named after Larry Bird, allows teams to go over the salary cap to retain their players under certain circumstances. If a player signs with his original team using that exception on a contract that is worth more than the NBA minimum and gives him a raise of over 20 percent, he is also ineligible for a trade until January 15th.
  • There are a certain number of players that, functionally speaking, have no-trade clauses due to the nature of their contracts. Any player on a one-year contract who is set to earn either “Early Bird Rights” or ” Larry Bird Rights” is allowed to veto any trade involving them because they would lose those rights in the deal, and instead become free agents at the end of the year with the less advantageous “Non-Bird Rights” as their new team’s only method of going over the cap to retain them short of other cap exceptions. This rule was most famously applied in 2008 when Devean George, a role player included only for salary purposes, nearly derailed a trade that would have sent Jason Kidd to the Dallas Mavericks by refusing to be included.

Those are the rules of trading free agents in a nutshell, and they are particularly relevant at this time of year. Teams have now seen their free agent additions for nearly a third of the season. They know how they fit, or in some cases, don’t fit, with their existing rosters. With nearly half of the league set to reach free agency at the end of this season and so many teams trying to clear cap space for that inevitability, trades and buyouts are going to be frequent this season. It is therefore critical to understand when last year’s free agents can be moved in order to try to predict what sort of chaos will follow.

The players listed below can all be traded in the near future. Most of them can be moved on December 15th. Some will need to be held until January 15th, and others have veto power. Each has a different likelihood of actually being dealt. So let’s dive into every player that will gain newfound trade eligibility in the near future.

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope

(Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein, Getty)

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, the Lakers guard who most often draws the scorn of fans for his inconsistent play, is eligible to be traded on December 15th after returning to the Lakers as a free agent. There is a catch, though. Caldwell-Pope signed a one-year deal with a team that he had played for in the previous season, setting him up to earn Early Bird Rights next summer. He therefore has the right to veto any trade, as a move would eliminate any rights that a new team would have to him in free agency next season. This creates a very interesting dynamic, as Caldwell-Pope is represented by Klutch Sports, the agency that fellow Laker LeBron James is, at the very least, heavily embedded within. Could James and his agency pressure Caldwell-Pope into accepting a trade if the right one presented itself? That is a story to watch from this point forward.

Rajon Rondo

(Photo: Orlando Ramirez-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Rajon Rondo is eligible to be traded as of December 15th, and thanks to his straightforward one-year deal at a high cap figure ($9 million), he is highly tradeable. The Lakers likely don’t plan to keep Rondo beyond the season as Lonzo Ball has steadily grown into the point guard role, but his salary number could be useful in the event of a blockbuster deal for a star. It would allow the Lakers to easily match the high cap figure of the incoming player without the team in question having to absorb a long-term deal. If the Lakers do deal for a superstar before the deadline, expect Rondo to be involved.

Lance Stephenson

(Photo: Thearon W. Henderson, Getty)

Lance Stephenson was a typical free agent signing, and is therefore tradeable as of December 15th. His performance has been inconsistent, but he has generally been a sparkplug for the Lakers off of the bench. All in all, he has been a net positive, and as the Lakers are trying to win right now, they would likely only move Stephenson if his salary was needed as part of another trade. He would not be traded on his own for the sake of improving the roster or adding long-term assets.

Michael Beasley

(Photo: Ethan Miller, Getty)

Michael Beasley has largely been out of the rotation for the Lakers this season, though he has taken on some minutes of late. Still, he is mostly a cap figure to this team. He is an easy $3.5 million to add into any deal as he expires at the end of the season. He is eligible for a move as of December 15th.

JaVale McGee

(Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein, Getty)

JaVale McGee is indeed eligible to be traded as of December 15th, but the Lakers would have virtually no reason to get rid of him. He has been stellar for them all season on a minimum-salary contract. The Minimum Salary Exception that allows teams to sign veterans like McGee so cheaply also prevents him from serving as salary filler in a trade. The only reason that the Lakers would have to trade McGee would be if a team giving them a superstar insisted upon his inclusion, a very unlikely scenario given both their likely pivot to a rebuild and his one-year deal (and likely proclivity to return to the Lakers in the offseason considering his affinity for the team and city so far). McGee is staying put for the rest of the year barring something extremely unlikely.

LeBron James

(Photo: Kim Klement, USA TODAY Sports)

Yes, LeBron James is eligible to be traded on December 15th. Does anybody on Earth think he actually will be? No? That’s what I thought. James technically doesn’t have a no-trade clause in his contract. He doesn’t need one. He is one of the few players with such leverage that he effectively has one regardless of what his contract says. James has accomplished enough on the court and has enough opportunities off of the court to squash any deal by threatening to retire. He could follow through on that threat if he liked, and the league office would likely pressure the Lakers not to move him without his consent with that threat dangling. So I apologize to anyone reading this expecting me to send James to their team. He isn’t going to be traded.

Trevor Ariza

(Photo: Jonathan Bachman, Getty)

The Suns tried to trade Trevor Ariza to the Wizards, but a mixup of Dillion Brooks and MarShon Brooks squashed the deal. Ariza remains a Sun. for now. The Lakers have been interested in Ariza for weeks, and though the Suns do not want to move him to the Lakers, they might not have a choice if a better offer doesn’t top theirs soon given the PR mess this situation has created. It all happened before December 15th. Ariza became trade-eligible not long after the mixup, and a trade is going to come soon just to put an end to this entire saga. It might be the Lakers. It might be the Rockets. It might be a surprise team. But someone is going to add Ariza.

Julius Randle

(Photo: Layne Murdoch Jr., Getty)

Julius Randle is playing very well this season and will almost certainly opt-out of his contract after the year to try to secure a long-term pact. If the Pelicans fall out of the playoff race, that makes him an interesting trade chip. They cannot afford to re-sign him this offseason as they do not have any form of Bird Rights on him, meaning they cannot go over the cap to retain him. They would need cap space, which they don’t have.

Brook Lopez

(Photo: Chris Humphreys, Getty)

Brook Lopez has been a terrific bargain for the Bucks in costing them only $3 million to serve as a three-point gunning center. He is eligible to be moved on December 15th, but given how well he has played, the Bucks won’t even consider moving him.

Nerlens Noel

(Photo: Zach Beeker, Getty)

Nerlens Noel can be lumped in with other December 15th players, but on his minimum-salary contract, a trade is unlikely. He is a useful piece for the Thunder, but not valuable enough to net anything significant in a one-for-one deal. Without the ability to be used as salary filler, he’s staying put.

Raymond Felton

Raymond Felton is on a one-year minimum deal, so he is unlikely to be dealt. But he is eligible to be traded as of December 15th. If the Thunder were to fall off of a cliff and some other team wanted a steady backup point guard, he might be worth a second-round pick in a trade.

Kevin Durant

(Photo: Kyle Terada, USA TODAY Sports)

Before you get your hopes up about the Warriors dealing Kevin Durant before he ditches them as a free agent, remember that on a one-year deal that will lead to him earning full Bird Rights with the Warriors next summer, he must consent to a deal. If Durant had wanted to leave, he would have done so as a free agent. He is going to be a Warrior for the rest of this season.

DeMarcus Cousins

(Photo: Kyle Terada, USA TODAY Sports)

DeMarcus Cousins is on a one-year deal, but does not need consent to be dealt as he is not in line to receive Early Bird Rights or full Bird Rights this offseason. Still, given his health, a trade seems unlikely. Unless he comes back far earlier than expected and dominates the NBA, he wouldn’t figure to have much value. Even if he did, and even if the Warriors wanted to snatch a chance to cash in on a rare trade chip that they would likely lose anyway, doing so would greatly damage their reputation among players. Why would any free agent choose to sign with them after that? Why would Durant remain with a team so callous? Cousins will be a Warrior through the end of the year.

Kevon Looney

(Photo: Orlando Ramirez, USA TODAY Sports)

Kevon Looney was a bigger part of last year’s championship team than most remember, and could still be helpful in a bench role. The Warriors have too many centers as is, but they have never shown any inclination towards trading their surplus of bigs. They know Looney can help them. Even with the December 15th deadline granting him trade eligibility, the Warriors won’t move him.

Jonas Jerebko

(Photo: Russ Isabella-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Jonas Jerebko is eligible to be dealt as of December 15th, but the Warriors wouldn’t have a reason to move him. The Rockets exposed their lack of perimeter depth last season. Jerebko isn’t perfect, but he is their best option on the wing beyond their stars and staples.

Rudy Gay

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Rudy Gay can be traded as of December 15th, and if the Spurs fall out of the playoff race, he would be an interesting chip. Plenty of teams in the hunt could use an extra scorer. The Spurs might be able to get a pick out of Gay.

Marco Belinelli

(Photo: Bill Streicher, USA TODAY Sports)

Marco Belinelli is eligible for a trade with all of the other December 15th players. He is a Spurs favorite, and isn’t on his first tour of duty with the team, so it seems unlikely that he is dealt.

Dante Cunningham

(Photo: Chris Humphreys, USA TODAY Sports)

Dante Cunningham was a standard free agent, eligible to be traded on December 15th with all of the others. He is a useful bench piece particularly as a stretch big man, but he wouldn’t net much in a deal.

Quincy Pondexter

(Photo: Mark J. Rebilas, USA TODAY Sports)

Quincy Pondexter, like Cunningham, wouldn’t get the Spurs much in a trade. But he is eligible for a deal on December 15th, so he draws inclusion on this list. He is the sort of player that bounces around from team to team by year.

Aron Baynes

(Photo: USA Today, 247Sports)

Aron Baynes is tradeable on December 15th, and he represents an interesting piece of a bigger puzzle for the Celtics. Boston needed to sign a few mid-sized contracts this offseason for the purpose of creating salary filler for a blockbuster trade. They did that with Baynes and Marcus Smart. Smart has a much higher salary and another complication we will address later on. For a team seeking shorter-term salary filler, Baynes is a nice alternative on a two-year deal. He is a useful big man who is starting to extend his range to the three-point line.

Jabari Bird

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Jabari Bird is not nearly as exciting from a trade perspective as Baynes, but the two are eligible to be dealt at the same time: December 15th. Just don’t expect anything too interesting to come out of Bird on the market, even with his famous Celtics last name.

Brad Wanamaker

(Photo: Brian Babineau, Getty)

Brad Wanamaker is much like Jabari Bird here: eligible to be dealt on December 15th, but unlikely to be due simply to lack of interest. He is a bottom of the roster player at this point, so expect him to stick around.

Rodney Hood

Rodney Hood will be a fascinating trade subject when December 15th rolls around. Plenty of teams could look at his talent and see a player that they would want to pluck off of a struggling Cleveland team and mold, but because of the circumstances of his contract, they couldn’t add his Bird Rights. Hood is on a one-year deal and needs consent to be dealt, which would wipe away his rights. In other words, Hood’s best contractual stance is to remain in Cleveland for the sake of giving them additional avenues to signing him for the long haul. The best move for his career, though, might be getting to a competent organization. Odds are, Hood stays, but he’s worth discussing at the very least.

David Nwaba

(Photo: Brian Babineau, Getty)

David Nwaba is just a rotation player for Cleveland. His youth makes him more valuable to them than to other teams, though he isn’t particularly promising anywhere. He can be moved on December 15th.

Channing Frye

Channing Frye has been the mid-season addition of a champion before. That is how he got to Cleveland for his first run with the Cavaliers. Given their youth movement, he could be a similar addition for another contender on December 15th.

Alex Len

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Alex Len was once a top-five pick in the NBA Draft. He is now nothing more than a minutes-eater. He can help a team desperate for a body at center, and someone will call the Hawks after December 15th for that purpose, but make no mistake: Len isn’t contributing to winning basketball in 2020.

Vince Carter

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

If Vince Carter wanted a December 15th trade, he would get one. It just doesn’t seem like he is interested in chasing rings. He likes getting minutes and being a part of a young team. He is still a useful rotation piece (at least for regular season purposes). He just doesn’t look particularly motivated to try his hand at the postseason and a potential championship run. The Hawks like having him around as a mentor, so the two sides will likely stick together.

Daniel Hamilton

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Daniel Hamilton is eligible to be dealt on December 15th, there just won’t be much motivation for such a trade. He isn’t exactly a hot name right now, so he’ll likely stick with the Hawks this season.

Shabazz Napier

(Photo: Steve Mitchell)

Shabazz Napier was a helpful backup on a playoff team last year, and the Nets are aggressive in finding picks wherever possible. Now that December 15th is here, Napier could be a trade addition for a playoff team looking for a scoring guard off of the bench.

Ed Davis

(Photo: Brett Davis, USA TODAY Sports)

Ed Davis fits the same bill as Napier. He can still help teams, and the Nets are prepared to capitalize on that once December 15th rolls around. They are happy to keep him, but if someone makes an offer, he will likely go.

Treveon Graham

(Photo: Steven Ryan, Getty)

Treveon Graham is eligible to be moved on December 15th, but is only 25. The Nets want to hold onto young talent where possible, so they won’t have any motivation to move Graham unless they are blown away. That seems unlikely.

Tony Parker

(Photo: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Any team looking for a backup point guard would love to have even a diminished older Tony Parker. He is eligible for a December 15th trade, but his availability will come down to whether or not the Hornets remain in the playoff hunt. If not? Don’t be surprised if a better team tries to nab him.

Jabari Parker

(Photo: Jeff Hanisch, USA TODAY Sports)

Jabari Parker has a scary contract at $40 million over two years, but the second season is a team option. That means that if a team can match his salary, they can essentially take a flier on Parker on a one-year deal as of December 15th. As a former No. 2 overall pick who can score, the right team might be able to turn him into the star many hoped he would be.

Antonio Blakeney

(Photo: Kevin Jairaj, USA TODAY Sports)

Antonio Blakeney has become a much better offensive player in his second offensive season, shooting efficiently from long range in a bench role. He is eligible for a December 15th trade, but the rebuilding Bulls will want to keep him around.

Ryan Arcidiacono

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Ryan Arcidiacano is known as a star at Villanova, but his three-point shot has come on enough in his second NBA season to make him an interesting prospect. The Bulls have been using him as a starter, so a trade is unlikely even though he can be moved on December 15th.

Glenn Robinson III

(Photo: Andy Lyons, Getty)

Glenn Robinson III is just about reaching the point where his youth does not offer promise. Now in his fifth NBA season, he is nothing more than a role player at best. The Pistons wouldn’t turn down a decent offer if it came after December 15th.

Jose Calderon

(Photo: Adam Hunger, USA TODAY Sports)

Jose Calderon is just roster filler at this point. He played on an NBA Finals team last season, but at this point in his career, he just isn’t going to contribute to postseason winning. He is eligible for a move on December 15th.

Zaza Pachula

Zaza Pachulia can be moved as of December 15th, but not many teams would be interested in him. He lived out his usefulness as a member of the Warriors. If they couldn’t find a way to justify keeping him on the court last season, nobody else will.

Tyreke Evans

(Photo: Nelson Chenault, USA TODAY Sports)

Tyreke Evans is a sneaky trade candidate. He can be dealt as of December 15th, and he is only on a one-year deal. The Pacers need him to be their backup ball-handler, but he has taken a major step back after a strong year for the Grizzlies last season. If the Pacers need salary filler for another trade, Evans makes sense.

Kyle O’Quinn

(Photo: Reinhold Matay, USA TODAY Sports)

Kyle O’Quinn would be an interesting piece for a playoff team in a trade, but the Pacers will keep him for that reason. He can be traded on December 15th. He just probably won’t be.

Doug McDermott

(Photo: Brace Hemmelgarn, USA TODAY Sports)

Doug McDermott remains an elite shooter from three-point range, but he hasn’t added much else to his game in the NBA. On the first year of a long-term deal with the Pacers, interest would likely be sparse.

Dwyane Wade

(Photo: Bill Streicher, USA TODAY Sports)

Yes, Dwyane Wade can be traded soon (technically on December 18th, three months after he signed his last contract, but we aren’t sticklers). No, he won’t be moved. Both he and the Heat saw what life was like without the other. Neither has any reason to try it again. Wade will retire with the Heat.

Wayne Ellington

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

If the Heat continue to struggle, Wayne Ellington becomes one of the most interesting role players on the market. He is a truly elite shooter that any contender would love. The problem? He has to approve of any trade due to Bird Rights restrictions. But Ellington has played on one-year deals for years. The chance to go to a contender and prove his worth might make sense even at the expense of Bird Rights. So much cap space is floating around the NBA after the season that his rights might not matter much. Someone will be willing and able to pay him this summer. That veto power could be valuable if the wrong team tries to add Ellington.

Derrick Jones

Derrick Jones is eligible for a December 15th trade, but he probably won’t go anywhere. He is a fairly standard long-term Heat project. They will try to turn him into a real player over the long haul. If they fail, nobody else will bother trying.

Udonis Haslem

(Photo: Jeremy Brevard, USA TODAY Sports)

Udonis Haslem is in the same camp as Wade. Yes, he can be traded on December 15th. No, he won’t be. Haslem is a Heat lifer. Even Wade left for a short period. He will never play for another team and will likely have a job in the front office or coaching staff waiting for him after he retires.

Ersan Ilyasova

(Photo: Reinhold Matay, USA TODAY Sports)

Ersan Ilyasova is on a three-year deal and has lived up to the hopes that the Bucks had for him. A trade isn’t impossible, particularly as the Bucks try to clear cap space for 2020, but the December 15th trade eligibility Ilyasova has likely won’t see him moved.

Pat Connaughton

(Photo: Matt Cashore, USA TODAY Sports)

Pat Connaughton is a fringe young player. The Bucks have already made one trade this season. If they made another, Connaughton might be vulnerable once December 15th, when he is eligible for a trade, passes.

Christian Wood

(Photo: Kent Smith, Getty)

Christian Wood is not particularly promising. He is the sort of player that the Bucks would likely stick in a trade if necessary. He is such a small name, though, that his inclusion would depend on something bigger happening despite his December 15th eligibility.

Mario Hezonja

(Photo: Kim Klement, USA TODAY Sports)

Mario Hezonja has been largely the same player for the Knicks that he was for the Magic. He is a disappointing scorer who isn’t a major contributor elsewhere. If the Knicks see a chance to improve their long-term prospects, they won’t hesitate to move him on December 15th.

Luke Kornet

(Photo: Brad Rempel, USA TODAY Sports)

Luke Kornet is just a typical low-roster young player. The Knicks aren’t particularly attached to him, and if an opportunity to move him for good value on December 15th came, they wouldn’t hesitate to take it.

Noah Vonleh

(Photo: Catalina Fragoso, USA TODAY Sports)

Noah Vonleh is a former lottery pick who has disappointed, but is at least a decent rotation piece. If the Knicks remain out of the hunt, some team interested in improving its front court depth could call them on December 15th and make an offer for him that they couldn’t refuse.

Isaiah Briscoe

(Photo: Mitchell Leff, Getty)

Isaiah Briscoe is just a journeyman. His place in the NBA is safe at the moment, but no team would hold up a trade because of his inclusion, so he is a trade candidate as of December 15th.

J.J. Redick

(Photo: Bill Streicher, USA TODAY Sports)

J.J. Redick is eligible for a trade on December 15th, but the Sixers need his shooting too much to trade him. If they have an opportunity to add another star and need him as salary filler (as their best assets are now draft picks), then he could be traded. Otherwise, Redick is staying put, which is the likeliest outcome anyway as he has veto power over potential trades.

Amir Johnson

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Amir Johnson is a nice veteran presence, but as the Sixers transition into a veteran team, he becomes less and less necessary. They’d love to keep him, but if Johnson were necessary for a trade after December 15th, they would happily include him.

Lorenzo Brown

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Lorenzo Brown is just a bottom of the roster player. He hardly plays, and the Raptors are a contender. They would not hesitate to move him if it meant improving their roster as of December 15th.

Greg Monroe

Greg Monroe appears to be beyond the stage of his career in which he can meaningfully contribute to winning basketball. He is just eating up a roster spot on the Raptors, so they would move him if they had any chance to improve.

Dwight Howard

(Photo: Geoff Burke, USA TODAY Sports)

Dwight Howard is so toxic in a locker room that few teams would be willing to take him even as salary filler. So yes, he is available on December 15th. It just doesn’t seem likely that he is moved unless his new team were to waive him after a trade. Who wants Howard on their roster?

Jeff Green

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Jeff Green proved last season that he can contribute to a team making a deep playoff run, and he is only on a minimum contract. Given the league-wide desperation for wings, Green could find himself on a better team as of December 15th.

DeAndre Jordan

(Photo: Tom Szczerbowski, Getty)

DeAndre Jordan is only on a one-year deal in Dallas, but he has been good for a surprising Mavericks team. His future with the team is far from certain, but they have no reason to trade him right now unless it was in a package for a superstar. The Mavericks haven’t been linked to any stars that they’d need salary filler for, so for now, Jordan is staying put despite having December 15th trade eligibility.

Salah Mejri

(Photo: Matthew Emmons, USA TODAY Sports)

Salah Mejri has stuck around in the NBA longer than expected as a backup, but he is just that, a backup. If the Mavericks could include him in a post-December 15th deal, they would without a second thought if it would make them a better team. The only issue is that he needs to give his consent to any deal. That could complicate matters, so in all likelihood, he will stay with the Mavericks.

Dirk Nowitzki

(Photo: Jerome Miron, USA TODAY Sports)

If the Dallas Mavericks were going to trade Dirk Nowitzki, they would have done it years ago. He is going to retire with this team despite his December 15th eligibility. Almost anyone else here is available. Dirk is not.

Devin Harris

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

If any team were interested in a veteran backup point guard and could give the Mavericks a long-term asset, they might be inclined to deal Devin Harris. He can be moved on December 15th and still help a new team.

Ryan Broekhoff

(Photo: Ronald Martinez, Getty)

Ryan Broekhoff is just lingering on the bottom of the Dallas roster. He isn’t an important player in any regard, so the Mavericks would be perfectly fine with dealing him if the opportunity struck on or after December 15th.

Torrey Craig

(Photo: Matthew Stockman, Getty)

Torrey Craig has carved out a nice role for himself as a defensive ace for the Nuggets. He is trade eligible as of December 15th, but the Nuggets need him too much to move him unless they were making a multi-player deal for a core piece. Craig is probably staying put.

Isaiah Thomas

Isaiah Thomas got traded last season, but his situation is too complicated right now to predict a similar outcome this year. He is not healthy yet, and it’s unclear just how good he can be. The Nuggets signed him for his upside. They have no reason to sell low on him given the low price they paid.

James Ennis

(Photo: Bill Baptist, Getty)

James Ennis is eligible for a December 15th trade, and he hasn’t lived up to what the Rockets hoped for when they signed him. He is a useful defender who shoots around league-average percentages, but he has been a steep drop off from Trevor Ariza. The Rockets don’t have a compelling reason to move him. But they could still upgrade him.

Michael Carter-Williams

Michael Carter-Williams has largely fallen out of the rotation in Houston. The former Rookie of the Year is nothing more than a fringe player who will earn minimum-salary contracts the rest of his career. He could be fodder in a bigger trade, but probably won’t be despite December 15th eligibility.

Gerald Green

Gerald Green was out of the league when the Rockets resurrected his career. They like what he brings as a shooter off of the bench. He likes being a Rocket. Unless he is needed for a big trade, his December 15th eligibility won’t matter. Either way, he has veto power over any deal.

Carmelo Anthony

(Photo: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

The Rockets held onto Carmelo Anthony rather than waiving him because they preferred the idea of trading his salary on or after December 15th. They are a luxury tax team after all. They have to think about expenses. They will seek out an Anthony deal, but will likely need to attach a draft pick to get rid of him.

Mike Scott

(Photo: Ned Dishman, Getty)

The Clippers have a good thing going. Mike Scott is giving them valuable minutes off the bench. His contract isn’t onerous. They are winning basketball games. He is eligible for a December 15th deal, but the Clippers aren’t going to move him.

Luc Richard Mbah a Moute

(Photo: Erik Williams-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, like Scott, is just a valuable role player on a one-year deal. The Clippers would deal him if they had an avenue to a superstar right now. But they’d be completely fine keeping this group together. December 15th won’t be an active day for them.

Tyrone Wallace

(Photo: Gary A. Vasquez, USA TODAY Sports)

The Clippers like Tyrone Wallace as a long-term developmental piece. They are big-game hunting right now, and would of course move him if a star became available. But for now, the Clippers will be holding onto Wallace past the December 15th eligibility mark.

Kyle Anderson

(Photo: Soobum Im, USA TODAY Sports)

The Grizzlies have been very happy with Kyle Anderson, and as a team, they don’t like to rock the boat. They haven’t made a blockbuster trade this decade. Don’t expect them to start now. Anderson will play out his four-year deal in Memphis, regardless of his December 15th trade eligibility.

Shelvin Mack

Shelvin Mack is your typical backup point guard. Nothing special, fairly useful on a team that knows how to use him. The Grizzlies need a backup point guard. They aren’t going to rush to trade Mack just because they can on December 15th.

Omri Casspi

(Photo: Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Omri Casspi flamed out with the Warriors last year and is now in a small role with the Grizzlies. He gives them good minutes off of the bench, so unless they get a great offer, he is probably sticking around beyond his December 15th trade eligibility date.

Anthony Tolliver

Anthony Tolliver is one of the more respected locker-room veterans in the NBA and a valuable three-point threat. The Timberwolves can trade him as of December 15th, but won’t want to as his presence will help in establishing a new team culture after the Jimmy Butler trade.

Derrick Rose

(Photo: Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

The Wolves were the only team interested in Derrick Rose when he was waived by the Jazz last year. He has rewarded them with a solid season off of the bench. They have already made their big move of the year. They are keeping Rose even after December 15th.

Luol Deng

(Photo: Joshua Dahl, USA TODAY Sports)

Luol Deng signed with the Wolves during the offseason, and like Rose, they were the only team seriously interested in adding him. Tom Thibodeau won’t ship out any of his former Bulls by choice, so December 15th won’t matter for Deng.

James Nunnally

(Photo: Hannah Foslien, Getty)

James Nunnally is just a bottom of the roster player. He won’t factor heavily into the Wolves’ plans, so if they could move him on December 15th as part of a bigger deal, they would do so without blinking.

Elfrid Payton

(Photo: Fernando Medina, Getty)

Elfrid Payton has barely played this season due to injury. At best he is a backup point guard, but the Pelicans don’t exactly have a better option there. They’ll likely keep him beyond December 15th for that reason.

Jahlil Okafor

(Photo: Tommy Gilligan)

Jahlil Okafor is barely hanging on as an NBA player. He doesn’t have a long future in the league, so the Pelicans would be more than happy to deal him if it made them better on December 15th.

Kenrich Williams

(Photo: Icon Sportswire, Getty)

Kenrich Williams is nothing more than a bottom of the roster player. The Pelicans would have no qualms about trading him on December 15th or any time afterward.

Ian Clark

(Photo: Jake Roth, USA TODAY Sports)

Ian Clark is a former champion with the Warriors and a solid shooter. His defense never developed to the point that he was playable in a serious way, though. The Pelicans would trade him in the right opportunity as of December 15th.

Seth Curry

(Photo: Raymond Carlin III, USA TODAY Sports)

The younger Curry is no star, but Seth is a valuable shooter on a good contract. Any team looking to space the floor and maybe sell a few jerseys would love to have him. The Blazers don’t seem inclined to move him as of December 15th, though, so expect him to stay put.

Nik Stauskas

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Nik Stauskas was a high draft pick once, and he shows flashes every now and then. But the Blazers wouldn’t let him stand in the way of their greater organizational plans. He will be available as of December 15th.

Nemanja Bjelica

Nemanja Bjelica has become an important part of Sacramento’s offense as one of the designated floor spacers for their pick-and-roll attack. He spurned the Sixers to join the Kings, so it would be a bad PR move to trade him, but he is technically available as of December 15th.

Yogi Ferrell

(Photo: Darrell Bird, USA TODAY Sports)

Yogi Ferrell is a nice young backup point guard, one that the Kings would probably prefer to keep. December 15th should come and go without a trade of Ferrell.

Georges Niang

(Photo: David Banks)

Georges Niang is a journeyman. The Jazz would be more than happy to trade him under the right circumstances. December 15th puts his immediate future at risk should the right opportunity present itself.

Marcus Smart

(Photo: Trevor Ruszkowski, USA TODAY Sports)

Marcus Smart is not eligible to be traded until January 15th. That is due to the archaic base-year compensation restrictions that were at play in his contract. It was widely speculated that the Celtics traded Smart for the sake of creating a mid-range salary to use in a trade for a superstar. The extra month of ineligibility makes that more difficult, but they will still have time before the trade deadline to move him if they’d like to. More importantly, he is under contract for four years, so they’ll have plenty of time to use him as a trade chip if that is their intention.

Joe Harris

(Photo: Ken Blaze, USA TODAY Sports)

Joe Harris is not eligible to be traded until January 15th, and the Nets don’t seem all that inclined to move him even then. Their three-point heavy scheme needs shooters like him, so Harris is staying put.

Zach LaVine

(Photo: Dennis Wierzbicki, USA TODAY Sports)

Zach LaVine has emerged as a potential All-Star this season for the Bulls. They were ridiculed for signing him to a four-year, $78 million deal this offseason. That now might be a bargain, and the Bulls aren’t complaining about having to wait until January 15th for him to become trade-eligible because they aren’t interested in trading him.

Aaron Gordon

Aaron Gordon is not tradeable until January 15th, and his future is a mystery. The Magic have not made the playoffs since Dwight Howard played for them. Gordon was not drafted by the current regime. That same regime has added several players of similar physical proportions to Gordon. In other words, don’t be surprised if he is moved at the deadline.

Fred VanVleet

(Photo: Vaughn Ridley, Getty)

The Raptors value depth more than most teams. Their backup point guard, Fred VanVleet, is proof of what can happen when a team is patient with their young bench players. Several teams would love to trade for him, but they will have to wait until January 15th to even try. They will likely be rebuffed if they try.

Nikola Jokic

(Photo: Matthew Stockman, Getty)

Nikola Jokic signed a five-year max extension with the Nuggets in the offseason. He isn’t eligible to be traded until January 15th. The Nuggets won’t actually consider trading him until several years after that, if ever.

Will Barton

(Photo: Greg Bartram)

Will Barton can be traded on January 15th, but the Nuggets just signed him to a four-year deal. He seems to have found a home with them, and regardless of the injury that has kept him out this year, they won’t have much interest in moving him this season.

Clint Capela

(Photo: Troy Taormina, USA TODAY Sports)

Clint Capela signed a long-term deal with the Rockets in the offseason. That likely means that he will stick around beyond December 15th, but the Rockets are struggling this year. They are never shy about making bold moves. If that means moving Capela, nobody will be particularly surprised.

Chris Paul

Chris Paul and the Rockets are stuck together far beyond January 15th, when he technically can be moved. His four-year, $160 million deal makes him virtually untradeable, and the optics of moving not only a superstar so early into his contract, but the president of the NBPA, would be disastrous for the Rockets.

Avery Bradley

(Photo: Jeremy Brevard)

Avery Bradley can’t be traded until January 15th, and it is uncertain how available he will be. The Clippers plan to go big-game hunting in the offseason, and if moving Bradley ahead of time can help in their pursuit, they will do it. But they have played well this year and Bradley has been a big part of it. They would have to really like an offer to jump on it.

Montrezl Harrell

(Photo: Brace Hemmelgarn-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Montrezl Harrell is quickly establishing himself as a core part of the Clippers. He is on a very team-friendly contract and makes sense as part of both a long-term rebuild and the star-studded free agent-based roster that the Clippers are planning for. He can be traded as of January 15th. He won’t be.

Paul George

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

The Thunder will never trade Paul George if he doesn’t ask for it. He is an MVP candidate on a long-term deal, yes, but he also chose to play for them. After the sting of Kevin Durant leaving, the Thunder could not possibly trade that kind of star. He can be moved on January 15th, but there is no chance that it actually happens.

Jerami Grant

(Photo: Troy Taormina, USA TODAY Sports)

Jerami Grant has moved into the starting lineup for the Thunder and starred there. His defense is irreplaceable and his youth is tantalizing. He can be moved on January 15th, but the Thunder view him as a long-term piece of their core.

Jamal Crawford

(Photo: Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Jamal Crawford signed with the Suns just before the season. That makes him trade-eligible on January 15th due to the three-month restriction, a rare case. If any contenders thought he could help they would have signed him as a free agent. If Crawford changes teams, it will likely be through a buyout.

Jusuf Nurkic

(Photo: Christian Petersen, Getty)

Jusuf Nurkic signed a long-term pact with the Blazers in the offseason, but don’t be surprised if his name appears in rumors on January 15th. Zach Collins is ready for a bigger role and Nurkic is standing in his way. The Blazers might have signed him with the idea that they could trade him down the line. It isn’t a certainty, but it’s worth considering.

Davis Bertans

(Photo: Thearon W. Henderson, Getty)

Davis Bertans can be traded as of January 15th, but the question is what direction the Spurs will be going in at that point. They are near the bottom of the Western Conference. Would they consider a mid-season shakeup to try to push themselves into the playoffs? It’s possible.

Bryn Forbes

(Photo: Soobum Im, USA TODAY Sports)

The Spurs have used Bryn Forbes as their starting point guard this season, but they have a number of young guards in the pipeline and Dejounte Murray is their long-term starter when he returns. Forbes can be traded as of January 15th. It wouldn’t be shocking if he was.

Derrick Favors

(Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)

Derrick Favors can be moved on January 15th, and if he isn’t, his time with the Jazz will still likely come to an end after the season. The Jazz have a team-option on Favors and would probably prefer to allocate their resources on perimeter players. They already have a star center. They don’t need an expensive power forward as well.

Dante Exum

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

The Jazz made a big bet on Dante Exum by giving him a three-year deal. Most teams wouldn’t have made such a strong commitment to a player who hadn’t shown much after being a top-five pick. Therefore, it’s unlikely that anyone will be all that interested in Exum when he is eligible for a trade on January 15th.

Raul Neto

(Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein, Getty)

Raul Neto has been with the Jazz for several years as a backup, but is ultimately a journeyman. He can be moved on January 15th, and the Jazz would have no issue dumping him in a bigger deal.

Two Thunder players are eligible to be traded on December 15th

As a rule, NBA teams can’t trade free agents right when they sign. There are exceptions under specific circumstances for sign-and-trade deals, but for the most part, the league expects teams to hold players they sign for a reasonable length of time. Think of the optics. Imagine if the Golden State Warriors had signed Kevin Durant and then immediately traded him for players that they wouldn’t have had access to otherwise.

That would have been a PR disaster, and it would have been highly unfair to him or any free agent under those circumstances. A player signs with a team with the expectation that they will play for that team. They may not for the life of their contract, but they deserve to at least start the season with the team of their choice. It’s just common sense. The NBA isn’t franchise mode in a video game. There are strict rules governing trades.

What exactly are those rules when it comes to free agent signings? Here are the basics:

  • Most free agents signed during the offseason can be traded on December 15th of that league year or three months after signing their deal, whichever comes second. In a given year, this will usually comprise around 80 percent of free agent additions.
  • The most common exception relates to players that can only be traded on January 15th or later. There are two reasons why a player might not be tradeable until this date. The first relates to a term from old collective bargaining agreements called “Base-Year Compensation” that attempted to make it harder for teams to sign players for the purpose of trading them. It has largely been done away with in the modern league, and usually only crops up in regards to players who reached restricted free agency. The second is when a team exercises either “Early-Bird Rights” or “Larry Bird Rights” to re-sign one of its own players. This exception, named after Larry Bird, allows teams to go over the salary cap to retain their players under certain circumstances. If a player signs with his original team using that exception on a contract that is worth more than the NBA minimum and gives him a raise of over 20 percent, he is also ineligible for a trade until January 15th.
  • There are a certain number of players that, functionally speaking, have no-trade clauses due to the nature of their contracts. Any player on a one-year contract who is set to earn either “Early Bird Rights” or “Larry Bird Rights” is allowed to veto any trade involving them because they would lose those rights in the deal, and instead become free agents at the end of the year with the less advantageous “Non-Bird Rights” as their new team’s only method of going over the cap to retain them short of other cap exceptions. This rule was most famously applied in 2008 when Devean George, a role player included only for salary purposes, nearly derailed a trade that would have sent Jason Kidd to the Dallas Mavericks by refusing to be included.

Those are the rules of trading free agents in a nutshell, and they are particularly relevant at this time of year. Teams have now seen their free agent additions for nearly a third of the season. They know how they fit, or in some cases, don’t fit, with their existing rosters. With nearly half of the league set to reach free agency at the end of this season and so many teams trying to clear cap space for that inevitability, trades and buyouts are going to be frequent this season. It is therefore critical to understand when last year’s free agents can be moved in order to try to predict what sort of chaos will follow.

The players listed below can all be traded in the near future. Most of them can be moved on December 15th. Some will need to be held until January 15th, and others have veto power. Each has a different likelihood of actually being dealt. So let’s dive into every player that will gain newfound trade eligibility in the near future.

Kevin Durant

(Photo: Kyle Terada, USA TODAY Sports)

Before you get your hopes up about the Warriors dealing Kevin Durant before he ditches them as a free agent, remember that on a one-year deal that will lead to him earning full Bird Rights with the Warriors next summer, he must consent to a deal. If Durant had wanted to leave, he would have done so as a free agent. He is going to be a Warrior for the rest of this season.

Nerlens Noel

(Photo: Zach Beeker, Getty)

Nerlens Noel can be lumped in with other December 15th players, but on his minimum-salary contract, a trade is unlikely. He is a useful piece for the Thunder, but not valuable enough to net anything significant in a one-for-one deal. Without the ability to be used as salary filler, he’s staying put.

Raymond Felton

Raymond Felton is on a one-year minimum deal, so he is unlikely to be dealt. But he is eligible to be traded as of December 15th. If the Thunder were to fall off of a cliff and some other team wanted a steady backup point guard, he might be worth a second-round pick in a trade.

Paul George

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

The Thunder will never trade Paul George if he doesn’t ask for it. He is an MVP candidate on a long-term deal, yes, but he also chose to play for them. After the sting of Kevin Durant leaving, the Thunder could not possibly trade that kind of star. He can be moved on January 15th, but there is no chance that it actually happens.

Jerami Grant

(Photo: Troy Taormina, USA TODAY Sports)

Jerami Grant has moved into the starting lineup for the Thunder and starred there. His defense is irreplaceable and his youth is tantalizing. He can be moved on January 15th, but the Thunder view him as a long-term piece of their core.

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope

(Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein, Getty)

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, the Lakers guard who most often draws the scorn of fans for his inconsistent play, is eligible to be traded on December 15th after returning to the Lakers as a free agent. There is a catch, though. Caldwell-Pope signed a one-year deal with a team that he had played for in the previous season, setting him up to earn Early Bird Rights next summer. He therefore has the right to veto any trade, as a move would eliminate any rights that a new team would have to him in free agency next season. This creates a very interesting dynamic, as Caldwell-Pope is represented by Klutch Sports, the agency that fellow Laker LeBron James is, at the very least, heavily embedded within. Could James and his agency pressure Caldwell-Pope into accepting a trade if the right one presented itself? That is a story to watch from this point forward.

Rajon Rondo

(Photo: Orlando Ramirez-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Rajon Rondo is eligible to be traded as of December 15th, and thanks to his straightforward one-year deal at a high cap figure ($9 million), he is highly tradeable. The Lakers likely don’t plan to keep Rondo beyond the season as Lonzo Ball has steadily grown into the point guard role, but his salary number could be useful in the event of a blockbuster deal for a star. It would allow the Lakers to easily match the high cap figure of the incoming player without the team in question having to absorb a long-term deal. If the Lakers do deal for a superstar before the deadline, expect Rondo to be involved.

Lance Stephenson

(Photo: Thearon W. Henderson, Getty)

Lance Stephenson was a typical free agent signing, and is therefore tradeable as of December 15th. His performance has been inconsistent, but he has generally been a sparkplug for the Lakers off of the bench. All in all, he has been a net positive, and as the Lakers are trying to win right now, they would likely only move Stephenson if his salary was needed as part of another trade. He would not be traded on his own for the sake of improving the roster or adding long-term assets.

Michael Beasley

(Photo: Ethan Miller, Getty)

Michael Beasley has largely been out of the rotation for the Lakers this season, though he has taken on some minutes of late. Still, he is mostly a cap figure to this team. He is an easy $3.5 million to add into any deal as he expires at the end of the season. He is eligible for a move as of December 15th.

JaVale McGee

(Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein, Getty)

JaVale McGee is indeed eligible to be traded as of December 15th, but the Lakers would have virtually no reason to get rid of him. He has been stellar for them all season on a minimum-salary contract. The Minimum Salary Exception that allows teams to sign veterans like McGee so cheaply also prevents him from serving as salary filler in a trade. The only reason that the Lakers would have to trade McGee would be if a team giving them a superstar insisted upon his inclusion, a very unlikely scenario given both their likely pivot to a rebuild and his one-year deal (and likely proclivity to return to the Lakers in the offseason considering his affinity for the team and city so far). McGee is staying put for the rest of the year barring something extremely unlikely.

LeBron James

(Photo: Kim Klement, USA TODAY Sports)

Yes, LeBron James is eligible to be traded on December 15th. Does anybody on Earth think he actually will be? No? That’s what I thought. James technically doesn’t have a no-trade clause in his contract. He doesn’t need one. He is one of the few players with such leverage that he effectively has one regardless of what his contract says. James has accomplished enough on the court and has enough opportunities off of the court to squash any deal by threatening to retire. He could follow through on that threat if he liked, and the league office would likely pressure the Lakers not to move him without his consent with that threat dangling. So I apologize to anyone reading this expecting me to send James to their team. He isn’t going to be traded.

Julius Randle

(Photo: Layne Murdoch Jr., Getty)

Julius Randle is playing very well this season and will almost certainly opt-out of his contract after the year to try to secure a long-term pact. If the Pelicans fall out of the playoff race, that makes him an interesting trade chip. They cannot afford to re-sign him this offseason as they do not have any form of Bird Rights on him, meaning they cannot go over the cap to retain him. They would need cap space, which they don’t have.

Brook Lopez

(Photo: Chris Humphreys, Getty)

Brook Lopez has been a terrific bargain for the Bucks in costing them only $3 million to serve as a three-point gunning center. He is eligible to be moved on December 15th, but given how well he has played, the Bucks won’t even consider moving him.

DeMarcus Cousins

(Photo: Kyle Terada, USA TODAY Sports)

DeMarcus Cousins is on a one-year deal, but does not need consent to be dealt as he is not in line to receive Early Bird Rights or full Bird Rights this offseason. Still, given his health, a trade seems unlikely. Unless he comes back far earlier than expected and dominates the NBA, he wouldn’t figure to have much value. Even if he did, and even if the Warriors wanted to snatch a chance to cash in on a rare trade chip that they would likely lose anyway, doing so would greatly damage their reputation among players. Why would any free agent choose to sign with them after that? Why would Durant remain with a team so callous? Cousins will be a Warrior through the end of the year.

Kevon Looney

(Photo: Orlando Ramirez, USA TODAY Sports)

Kevon Looney was a bigger part of last year’s championship team than most remember, and could still be helpful in a bench role. The Warriors have too many centers as is, but they have never shown any inclination towards trading their surplus of bigs. They know Looney can help them. Even with the December 15th deadline granting him trade eligibility, the Warriors won’t move him.

Jonas Jerebko

(Photo: Russ Isabella-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Jonas Jerebko is eligible to be dealt as of December 15th, but the Warriors wouldn’t have a reason to move him. The Rockets exposed their lack of perimeter depth last season. Jerebko isn’t perfect, but he is their best option on the wing beyond their stars and staples.

Rudy Gay

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Rudy Gay can be traded as of December 15th, and if the Spurs fall out of the playoff race, he would be an interesting chip. Plenty of teams in the hunt could use an extra scorer. The Spurs might be able to get a pick out of Gay.

Marco Belinelli

(Photo: Bill Streicher, USA TODAY Sports)

Marco Belinelli is eligible for a trade with all of the other December 15th players. He is a Spurs favorite, and isn’t on his first tour of duty with the team, so it seems unlikely that he is dealt.

Dante Cunningham

(Photo: Chris Humphreys, USA TODAY Sports)

Dante Cunningham was a standard free agent, eligible to be traded on December 15th with all of the others. He is a useful bench piece particularly as a stretch big man, but he wouldn’t net much in a deal.

Quincy Pondexter

(Photo: Mark J. Rebilas, USA TODAY Sports)

Quincy Pondexter, like Cunningham, wouldn’t get the Spurs much in a trade. But he is eligible for a deal on December 15th, so he draws inclusion on this list. He is the sort of player that bounces around from team to team by year.

Aron Baynes

(Photo: USA Today, 247Sports)

Aron Baynes is tradeable on December 15th, and he represents an interesting piece of a bigger puzzle for the Celtics. Boston needed to sign a few mid-sized contracts this offseason for the purpose of creating salary filler for a blockbuster trade. They did that with Baynes and Marcus Smart. Smart has a much higher salary and another complication we will address later on. For a team seeking shorter-term salary filler, Baynes is a nice alternative on a two-year deal. He is a useful big man who is starting to extend his range to the three-point line.

Jabari Bird

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Jabari Bird is not nearly as exciting from a trade perspective as Baynes, but the two are eligible to be dealt at the same time: December 15th. Just don’t expect anything too interesting to come out of Bird on the market, even with his famous Celtics last name.

Brad Wanamaker

(Photo: Brian Babineau, Getty)

Brad Wanamaker is much like Jabari Bird here: eligible to be dealt on December 15th, but unlikely to be due simply to lack of interest. He is a bottom of the roster player at this point, so expect him to stick around.

Rodney Hood

Rodney Hood will be a fascinating trade subject when December 15th rolls around. Plenty of teams could look at his talent and see a player that they would want to pluck off of a struggling Cleveland team and mold, but because of the circumstances of his contract, they couldn’t add his Bird Rights. Hood is on a one-year deal and needs consent to be dealt, which would wipe away his rights. In other words, Hood’s best contractual stance is to remain in Cleveland for the sake of giving them additional avenues to signing him for the long haul. The best move for his career, though, might be getting to a competent organization. Odds are, Hood stays, but he’s worth discussing at the very least.

David Nwaba

(Photo: Brian Babineau, Getty)

David Nwaba is just a rotation player for Cleveland. His youth makes him more valuable to them than to other teams, though he isn’t particularly promising anywhere. He can be moved on December 15th.

Channing Frye

Channing Frye has been the mid-season addition of a champion before. That is how he got to Cleveland for his first run with the Cavaliers. Given their youth movement, he could be a similar addition for another contender on December 15th.

Alex Len

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Alex Len was once a top-five pick in the NBA Draft. He is now nothing more than a minutes-eater. He can help a team desperate for a body at center, and someone will call the Hawks after December 15th for that purpose, but make no mistake: Len isn’t contributing to winning basketball in 2020.

Vince Carter

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

If Vince Carter wanted a December 15th trade, he would get one. It just doesn’t seem like he is interested in chasing rings. He likes getting minutes and being a part of a young team. He is still a useful rotation piece (at least for regular season purposes). He just doesn’t look particularly motivated to try his hand at the postseason and a potential championship run. The Hawks like having him around as a mentor, so the two sides will likely stick together.

Daniel Hamilton

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Daniel Hamilton is eligible to be dealt on December 15th, there just won’t be much motivation for such a trade. He isn’t exactly a hot name right now, so he’ll likely stick with the Hawks this season.

Shabazz Napier

(Photo: Steve Mitchell)

Shabazz Napier was a helpful backup on a playoff team last year, and the Nets are aggressive in finding picks wherever possible. Now that December 15th is here, Napier could be a trade addition for a playoff team looking for a scoring guard off of the bench.

Ed Davis

(Photo: Brett Davis, USA TODAY Sports)

Ed Davis fits the same bill as Napier. He can still help teams, and the Nets are prepared to capitalize on that once December 15th rolls around. They are happy to keep him, but if someone makes an offer, he will likely go.

Treveon Graham

(Photo: Steven Ryan, Getty)

Treveon Graham is eligible to be moved on December 15th, but is only 25. The Nets want to hold onto young talent where possible, so they won’t have any motivation to move Graham unless they are blown away. That seems unlikely.

Tony Parker

(Photo: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Any team looking for a backup point guard would love to have even a diminished older Tony Parker. He is eligible for a December 15th trade, but his availability will come down to whether or not the Hornets remain in the playoff hunt. If not? Don’t be surprised if a better team tries to nab him.

Jabari Parker

(Photo: Jeff Hanisch, USA TODAY Sports)

Jabari Parker has a scary contract at $40 million over two years, but the second season is a team option. That means that if a team can match his salary, they can essentially take a flier on Parker on a one-year deal as of December 15th. As a former No. 2 overall pick who can score, the right team might be able to turn him into the star many hoped he would be.

Antonio Blakeney

(Photo: Kevin Jairaj, USA TODAY Sports)

Antonio Blakeney has become a much better offensive player in his second offensive season, shooting efficiently from long range in a bench role. He is eligible for a December 15th trade, but the rebuilding Bulls will want to keep him around.

Ryan Arcidiacono

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Ryan Arcidiacano is known as a star at Villanova, but his three-point shot has come on enough in his second NBA season to make him an interesting prospect. The Bulls have been using him as a starter, so a trade is unlikely even though he can be moved on December 15th.

Glenn Robinson III

(Photo: Andy Lyons, Getty)

Glenn Robinson III is just about reaching the point where his youth does not offer promise. Now in his fifth NBA season, he is nothing more than a role player at best. The Pistons wouldn’t turn down a decent offer if it came after December 15th.

Jose Calderon

(Photo: Adam Hunger, USA TODAY Sports)

Jose Calderon is just roster filler at this point. He played on an NBA Finals team last season, but at this point in his career, he just isn’t going to contribute to postseason winning. He is eligible for a move on December 15th.

Zaza Pachula

Zaza Pachulia can be moved as of December 15th, but not many teams would be interested in him. He lived out his usefulness as a member of the Warriors. If they couldn’t find a way to justify keeping him on the court last season, nobody else will.

Tyreke Evans

(Photo: Nelson Chenault, USA TODAY Sports)

Tyreke Evans is a sneaky trade candidate. He can be dealt as of December 15th, and he is only on a one-year deal. The Pacers need him to be their backup ball-handler, but he has taken a major step back after a strong year for the Grizzlies last season. If the Pacers need salary filler for another trade, Evans makes sense.

Kyle O’Quinn

(Photo: Reinhold Matay, USA TODAY Sports)

Kyle O’Quinn would be an interesting piece for a playoff team in a trade, but the Pacers will keep him for that reason. He can be traded on December 15th. He just probably won’t be.

Doug McDermott

(Photo: Brace Hemmelgarn, USA TODAY Sports)

Doug McDermott remains an elite shooter from three-point range, but he hasn’t added much else to his game in the NBA. On the first year of a long-term deal with the Pacers, interest would likely be sparse.

Dwyane Wade

(Photo: Bill Streicher, USA TODAY Sports)

Yes, Dwyane Wade can be traded soon (technically on December 18th, three months after he signed his last contract, but we aren’t sticklers). No, he won’t be moved. Both he and the Heat saw what life was like without the other. Neither has any reason to try it again. Wade will retire with the Heat.

Wayne Ellington

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

If the Heat continue to struggle, Wayne Ellington becomes one of the most interesting role players on the market. He is a truly elite shooter that any contender would love. The problem? He has to approve of any trade due to Bird Rights restrictions. But Ellington has played on one-year deals for years. The chance to go to a contender and prove his worth might make sense even at the expense of Bird Rights. So much cap space is floating around the NBA after the season that his rights might not matter much. Someone will be willing and able to pay him this summer. That veto power could be valuable if the wrong team tries to add Ellington.

Derrick Jones

Derrick Jones is eligible for a December 15th trade, but he probably won’t go anywhere. He is a fairly standard long-term Heat project. They will try to turn him into a real player over the long haul. If they fail, nobody else will bother trying.

Udonis Haslem

(Photo: Jeremy Brevard, USA TODAY Sports)

Udonis Haslem is in the same camp as Wade. Yes, he can be traded on December 15th. No, he won’t be. Haslem is a Heat lifer. Even Wade left for a short period. He will never play for another team and will likely have a job in the front office or coaching staff waiting for him after he retires.

Ersan Ilyasova

(Photo: Reinhold Matay, USA TODAY Sports)

Ersan Ilyasova is on a three-year deal and has lived up to the hopes that the Bucks had for him. A trade isn’t impossible, particularly as the Bucks try to clear cap space for 2020, but the December 15th trade eligibility Ilyasova has likely won’t see him moved.

Pat Connaughton

(Photo: Matt Cashore, USA TODAY Sports)

Pat Connaughton is a fringe young player. The Bucks have already made one trade this season. If they made another, Connaughton might be vulnerable once December 15th, when he is eligible for a trade, passes.

Christian Wood

(Photo: Kent Smith, Getty)

Christian Wood is not particularly promising. He is the sort of player that the Bucks would likely stick in a trade if necessary. He is such a small name, though, that his inclusion would depend on something bigger happening despite his December 15th eligibility.

Mario Hezonja

(Photo: Kim Klement, USA TODAY Sports)

Mario Hezonja has been largely the same player for the Knicks that he was for the Magic. He is a disappointing scorer who isn’t a major contributor elsewhere. If the Knicks see a chance to improve their long-term prospects, they won’t hesitate to move him on December 15th.

Luke Kornet

(Photo: Brad Rempel, USA TODAY Sports)

Luke Kornet is just a typical low-roster young player. The Knicks aren’t particularly attached to him, and if an opportunity to move him for good value on December 15th came, they wouldn’t hesitate to take it.

Noah Vonleh

(Photo: Catalina Fragoso, USA TODAY Sports)

Noah Vonleh is a former lottery pick who has disappointed, but is at least a decent rotation piece. If the Knicks remain out of the hunt, some team interested in improving its front court depth could call them on December 15th and make an offer for him that they couldn’t refuse.

Isaiah Briscoe

(Photo: Mitchell Leff, Getty)

Isaiah Briscoe is just a journeyman. His place in the NBA is safe at the moment, but no team would hold up a trade because of his inclusion, so he is a trade candidate as of December 15th.

J.J. Redick

(Photo: Bill Streicher, USA TODAY Sports)

J.J. Redick is eligible for a trade on December 15th, but the Sixers need his shooting too much to trade him. If they have an opportunity to add another star and need him as salary filler (as their best assets are now draft picks), then he could be traded. Otherwise, Redick is staying put, which is the likeliest outcome anyway as he has veto power over potential trades.

Amir Johnson

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Amir Johnson is a nice veteran presence, but as the Sixers transition into a veteran team, he becomes less and less necessary. They’d love to keep him, but if Johnson were necessary for a trade after December 15th, they would happily include him.

Lorenzo Brown

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Lorenzo Brown is just a bottom of the roster player. He hardly plays, and the Raptors are a contender. They would not hesitate to move him if it meant improving their roster as of December 15th.

Greg Monroe

Greg Monroe appears to be beyond the stage of his career in which he can meaningfully contribute to winning basketball. He is just eating up a roster spot on the Raptors, so they would move him if they had any chance to improve.

Dwight Howard

(Photo: Geoff Burke, USA TODAY Sports)

Dwight Howard is so toxic in a locker room that few teams would be willing to take him even as salary filler. So yes, he is available on December 15th. It just doesn’t seem likely that he is moved unless his new team were to waive him after a trade. Who wants Howard on their roster?

Jeff Green

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Jeff Green proved last season that he can contribute to a team making a deep playoff run, and he is only on a minimum contract. Given the league-wide desperation for wings, Green could find himself on a better team as of December 15th.

DeAndre Jordan

(Photo: Tom Szczerbowski, Getty)

DeAndre Jordan is only on a one-year deal in Dallas, but he has been good for a surprising Mavericks team. His future with the team is far from certain, but they have no reason to trade him right now unless it was in a package for a superstar. The Mavericks haven’t been linked to any stars that they’d need salary filler for, so for now, Jordan is staying put despite having December 15th trade eligibility.

Salah Mejri

(Photo: Matthew Emmons, USA TODAY Sports)

Salah Mejri has stuck around in the NBA longer than expected as a backup, but he is just that, a backup. If the Mavericks could include him in a post-December 15th deal, they would without a second thought if it would make them a better team. The only issue is that he needs to give his consent to any deal. That could complicate matters, so in all likelihood, he will stay with the Mavericks.

Dirk Nowitzki

(Photo: Jerome Miron, USA TODAY Sports)

If the Dallas Mavericks were going to trade Dirk Nowitzki, they would have done it years ago. He is going to retire with this team despite his December 15th eligibility. Almost anyone else here is available. Dirk is not.

Devin Harris

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

If any team were interested in a veteran backup point guard and could give the Mavericks a long-term asset, they might be inclined to deal Devin Harris. He can be moved on December 15th and still help a new team.

Ryan Broekhoff

(Photo: Ronald Martinez, Getty)

Ryan Broekhoff is just lingering on the bottom of the Dallas roster. He isn’t an important player in any regard, so the Mavericks would be perfectly fine with dealing him if the opportunity struck on or after December 15th.

Torrey Craig

(Photo: Matthew Stockman, Getty)

Torrey Craig has carved out a nice role for himself as a defensive ace for the Nuggets. He is trade eligible as of December 15th, but the Nuggets need him too much to move him unless they were making a multi-player deal for a core piece. Craig is probably staying put.

Isaiah Thomas

Isaiah Thomas got traded last season, but his situation is too complicated right now to predict a similar outcome this year. He is not healthy yet, and it’s unclear just how good he can be. The Nuggets signed him for his upside. They have no reason to sell low on him given the low price they paid.

James Ennis

(Photo: Bill Baptist, Getty)

James Ennis is eligible for a December 15th trade, and he hasn’t lived up to what the Rockets hoped for when they signed him. He is a useful defender who shoots around league-average percentages, but he has been a steep drop off from Trevor Ariza. The Rockets don’t have a compelling reason to move him. But they could still upgrade him.

Michael Carter-Williams

Michael Carter-Williams has largely fallen out of the rotation in Houston. The former Rookie of the Year is nothing more than a fringe player who will earn minimum-salary contracts the rest of his career. He could be fodder in a bigger trade, but probably won’t be despite December 15th eligibility.

Gerald Green

Gerald Green was out of the league when the Rockets resurrected his career. They like what he brings as a shooter off of the bench. He likes being a Rocket. Unless he is needed for a big trade, his December 15th eligibility won’t matter. Either way, he has veto power over any deal.

Carmelo Anthony

(Photo: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

The Rockets held onto Carmelo Anthony rather than waiving him because they preferred the idea of trading his salary on or after December 15th. They are a luxury tax team after all. They have to think about expenses. They will seek out an Anthony deal, but will likely need to attach a draft pick to get rid of him.

Mike Scott

(Photo: Ned Dishman, Getty)

The Clippers have a good thing going. Mike Scott is giving them valuable minutes off the bench. His contract isn’t onerous. They are winning basketball games. He is eligible for a December 15th deal, but the Clippers aren’t going to move him.

Luc Richard Mbah a Moute

(Photo: Erik Williams-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, like Scott, is just a valuable role player on a one-year deal. The Clippers would deal him if they had an avenue to a superstar right now. But they’d be completely fine keeping this group together. December 15th won’t be an active day for them.

Tyrone Wallace

(Photo: Gary A. Vasquez, USA TODAY Sports)

The Clippers like Tyrone Wallace as a long-term developmental piece. They are big-game hunting right now, and would of course move him if a star became available. But for now, the Clippers will be holding onto Wallace past the December 15th eligibility mark.

Kyle Anderson

(Photo: Soobum Im, USA TODAY Sports)

The Grizzlies have been very happy with Kyle Anderson, and as a team, they don’t like to rock the boat. They haven’t made a blockbuster trade this decade. Don’t expect them to start now. Anderson will play out his four-year deal in Memphis, regardless of his December 15th trade eligibility.

Shelvin Mack

Shelvin Mack is your typical backup point guard. Nothing special, fairly useful on a team that knows how to use him. The Grizzlies need a backup point guard. They aren’t going to rush to trade Mack just because they can on December 15th.

Omri Casspi

(Photo: Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Omri Casspi flamed out with the Warriors last year and is now in a small role with the Grizzlies. He gives them good minutes off of the bench, so unless they get a great offer, he is probably sticking around beyond his December 15th trade eligibility date.

Anthony Tolliver

Anthony Tolliver is one of the more respected locker-room veterans in the NBA and a valuable three-point threat. The Timberwolves can trade him as of December 15th, but won’t want to as his presence will help in establishing a new team culture after the Jimmy Butler trade.

Derrick Rose

(Photo: Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

The Wolves were the only team interested in Derrick Rose when he was waived by the Jazz last year. He has rewarded them with a solid season off of the bench. They have already made their big move of the year. They are keeping Rose even after December 15th.

Luol Deng

(Photo: Joshua Dahl, USA TODAY Sports)

Luol Deng signed with the Wolves during the offseason, and like Rose, they were the only team seriously interested in adding him. Tom Thibodeau won’t ship out any of his former Bulls by choice, so December 15th won’t matter for Deng.

James Nunnally

(Photo: Hannah Foslien, Getty)

James Nunnally is just a bottom of the roster player. He won’t factor heavily into the Wolves’ plans, so if they could move him on December 15th as part of a bigger deal, they would do so without blinking.

Elfrid Payton

(Photo: Fernando Medina, Getty)

Elfrid Payton has barely played this season due to injury. At best he is a backup point guard, but the Pelicans don’t exactly have a better option there. They’ll likely keep him beyond December 15th for that reason.

Jahlil Okafor

(Photo: Tommy Gilligan)

Jahlil Okafor is barely hanging on as an NBA player. He doesn’t have a long future in the league, so the Pelicans would be more than happy to deal him if it made them better on December 15th.

Kenrich Williams

(Photo: Icon Sportswire, Getty)

Kenrich Williams is nothing more than a bottom of the roster player. The Pelicans would have no qualms about trading him on December 15th or any time afterward.

Ian Clark

(Photo: Jake Roth, USA TODAY Sports)

Ian Clark is a former champion with the Warriors and a solid shooter. His defense never developed to the point that he was playable in a serious way, though. The Pelicans would trade him in the right opportunity as of December 15th.

Trevor Ariza

(Photo: Troy Taormina, USA TODAY Sports)

Trevor Ariza has been widely reported as available. The Suns are tanking, and having Ariza, an aging veteran, on a one-year pact makes little sense for them. If they can turn him into an asset, they will do so. Just about every contender will be interested in the stalwart three-and-D player. The Lakers have been linked to him most often, though, and should be viewed as the favorites.

Seth Curry

(Photo: Raymond Carlin III, USA TODAY Sports)

The younger Curry is no star, but Seth is a valuable shooter on a good contract. Any team looking to space the floor and maybe sell a few jerseys would love to have him. The Blazers don’t seem inclined to move him as of December 15th, though, so expect him to stay put.

Nik Stauskas

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

Nik Stauskas was a high draft pick once, and he shows flashes every now and then. But the Blazers wouldn’t let him stand in the way of their greater organizational plans. He will be available as of December 15th.

Nemanja Bjelica

Nemanja Bjelica has become an important part of Sacramento’s offense as one of the designated floor spacers for their pick-and-roll attack. He spurned the Sixers to join the Kings, so it would be a bad PR move to trade him, but he is technically available as of December 15th.

Yogi Ferrell

(Photo: Darrell Bird, USA TODAY Sports)

Yogi Ferrell is a nice young backup point guard, one that the Kings would probably prefer to keep. December 15th should come and go without a trade of Ferrell.

Georges Niang

(Photo: David Banks)

Georges Niang is a journeyman. The Jazz would be more than happy to trade him under the right circumstances. December 15th puts his immediate future at risk should the right opportunity present itself.

Marcus Smart

(Photo: Trevor Ruszkowski, USA TODAY Sports)

Marcus Smart is not eligible to be traded until January 15th. That is due to the archaic base-year compensation restrictions that were at play in his contract. It was widely speculated that the Celtics traded Smart for the sake of creating a mid-range salary to use in a trade for a superstar. The extra month of ineligibility makes that more difficult, but they will still have time before the trade deadline to move him if they’d like to. More importantly, he is under contract for four years, so they’ll have plenty of time to use him as a trade chip if that is their intention.

Joe Harris

(Photo: Ken Blaze, USA TODAY Sports)

Joe Harris is not eligible to be traded until January 15th, and the Nets don’t seem all that inclined to move him even then. Their three-point heavy scheme needs shooters like him, so Harris is staying put.

Zach LaVine

(Photo: Dennis Wierzbicki, USA TODAY Sports)

Zach LaVine has emerged as a potential All-Star this season for the Bulls. They were ridiculed for signing him to a four-year, $78 million deal this offseason. That now might be a bargain, and the Bulls aren’t complaining about having to wait until January 15th for him to become trade-eligible because they aren’t interested in trading him.

Aaron Gordon

Aaron Gordon is not tradeable until January 15th, and his future is a mystery. The Magic have not made the playoffs since Dwight Howard played for them. Gordon was not drafted by the current regime. That same regime has added several players of similar physical proportions to Gordon. In other words, don’t be surprised if he is moved at the deadline.

Fred VanVleet

(Photo: Vaughn Ridley, Getty)

The Raptors value depth more than most teams. Their backup point guard, Fred VanVleet, is proof of what can happen when a team is patient with their young bench players. Several teams would love to trade for him, but they will have to wait until January 15th to even try. They will likely be rebuffed if they try.

Nikola Jokic

(Photo: Matthew Stockman, Getty)

Nikola Jokic signed a five-year max extension with the Nuggets in the offseason. He isn’t eligible to be traded until January 15th. The Nuggets won’t actually consider trading him until several years after that, if ever.

Will Barton

(Photo: Greg Bartram)

Will Barton can be traded on January 15th, but the Nuggets just signed him to a four-year deal. He seems to have found a home with them, and regardless of the injury that has kept him out this year, they won’t have much interest in moving him this season.

Clint Capela

(Photo: Troy Taormina, USA TODAY Sports)

Clint Capela signed a long-term deal with the Rockets in the offseason. That likely means that he will stick around beyond December 15th, but the Rockets are struggling this year. They are never shy about making bold moves. If that means moving Capela, nobody will be particularly surprised.

Chris Paul

Chris Paul and the Rockets are stuck together far beyond January 15th, when he technically can be moved. His four-year, $160 million deal makes him virtually untradeable, and the optics of moving not only a superstar so early into his contract, but the president of the NBPA, would be disastrous for the Rockets.

Avery Bradley

(Photo: Jeremy Brevard)

Avery Bradley can’t be traded until January 15th, and it is uncertain how available he will be. The Clippers plan to go big-game hunting in the offseason, and if moving Bradley ahead of time can help in their pursuit, they will do it. But they have played well this year and Bradley has been a big part of it. They would have to really like an offer to jump on it.

Montrezl Harrell

(Photo: Brace Hemmelgarn-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Montrezl Harrell is quickly establishing himself as a core part of the Clippers. He is on a very team-friendly contract and makes sense as part of both a long-term rebuild and the star-studded free agent-based roster that the Clippers are planning for. He can be traded as of January 15th. He won’t be.

Jamal Crawford

(Photo: Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports, USA TODAY Sports)

Jamal Crawford signed with the Suns just before the season. That makes him trade-eligible on January 15th due to the three-month restriction, a rare case. If any contenders thought he could help they would have signed him as a free agent. If Crawford changes teams, it will likely be through a buyout.

Jusuf Nurkic

(Photo: Christian Petersen, Getty)

Jusuf Nurkic signed a long-term pact with the Blazers in the offseason, but don’t be surprised if his name appears in rumors on January 15th. Zach Collins is ready for a bigger role and Nurkic is standing in his way. The Blazers might have signed him with the idea that they could trade him down the line. It isn’t a certainty, but it’s worth considering.

Davis Bertans

(Photo: Thearon W. Henderson, Getty)

Davis Bertans can be traded as of January 15th, but the question is what direction the Spurs will be going in at that point. They are near the bottom of the Western Conference. Would they consider a mid-season shakeup to try to push themselves into the playoffs? It’s possible.

Bryn Forbes

(Photo: Soobum Im, USA TODAY Sports)

The Spurs have used Bryn Forbes as their starting point guard this season, but they have a number of young guards in the pipeline and Dejounte Murray is their long-term starter when he returns. Forbes can be traded as of January 15th. It wouldn’t be shocking if he was.

Derrick Favors

(Photo: Kelvin Kuo, USA TODAY Sports)

Derrick Favors can be moved on January 15th, and if he isn’t, his time with the Jazz will still likely come to an end after the season. The Jazz have a team-option on Favors and would probably prefer to allocate their resources on perimeter players. They already have a star center. They don’t need an expensive power forward as well.

Dante Exum

(Photo: USA TODAY Sports)

The Jazz made a big bet on Dante Exum by giving him a three-year deal. Most teams wouldn’t have made such a strong commitment to a player who hadn’t shown much after being a top-five pick. Therefore, it’s unlikely that anyone will be all that interested in Exum when he is eligible for a trade on January 15th.

Raul Neto

(Photo: Andrew D. Bernstein, Getty)

Raul Neto has been with the Jazz for several years as a backup, but is ultimately a journeyman. He can be moved on January 15th, and the Jazz would have no issue dumping him in a bigger deal.

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    Top Binary Options Broker 2020!
    Best Choice For Beginners!
    Big Sign-Up Bonus!
    Free Trading Education!
    Free Demo Account!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only For Experienced Traders!

Like this post? Please share to your friends:
Binary Options Trading Secrets
Leave a Reply

;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock: :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!: